IAFF Convention passes resolutions on Cancer and Behavioral Health

IAFF LogoTwo important resolutions addressing the physical and behavioral health of members passed as delegates at the IAFF 53rd Convention finished up the final business session.

Resolution 44 calls for the IAFF’s continued support for programs, initiatives and legislation that reduce cancer in the fire service and provide assistance to members fighting this disease. Research demonstrates that fire fighters are routinely exposed to cancer-causing carcinogens in the performance of their duties. The IAFF has worked with its state and provincial affiliates to advocate for the inclusion of several cancers in presumptive legislation and assisted members diagnosed with cancer.

Resolution 44 also commits efforts by the IAFF to reduce the risk ofcarcinogenic exposures and to support federal, state and provincial legislative efforts to pass cancer presumptive legislation.

Resolution 45 reaffirms the IAFF’s commitment to behavioral health initiatives by expanding resources,education and treatment for members. 

The nature, frequency and intensity of daily duty-related traumatic exposure have a cumulative effect on the mental health and well-being of fire fighters and emergency medical personnel. It is estimated that 20 percent of firefighters and emergency personnel in the U.S. suffer from post-traumatic stress. In passing this resolution, the IAFF vows to reduce the stigma associated with behavioral health issues and to continue to support and encourage federal, state and provincial governments to pass presumptive legislation covering post-traumatic stress

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resolution 44 also commits efforts by the IAFF to reduce the risk of         carcinogenic exposures and to support federal, state and provincial legislative efforts to pass cancer presumptive legislation.

Resolution 45 reaffirms the IAFF’s commitment to behavioral health      initiatives by expanding resources,     education and treatment for members. 

The nature, frequency and intensity of daily duty-related traumatic exposure have a cumulative effect on the mental health and well-being of fire fighters and emergency medical personnel. It is estimated that 20 percent of fire    fighters and emergency personnel in the U.S. suffer from post-traumatic stress.

In passing this resolution, the IAFF vows to reduce the stigma associated with behavioral health issues and to continue to support and encourage federal, state and provincial governments to pass presumptive legislation covering post-traumatic stress